Cardinal Directions
June 6, 2012
An Interview with Sharia Mayfield
Sharia Mayfield is a junior majoring in English and Creative Writing. Originally from the city of Portland, in Oregon, she has long been interested in and concerned by the erosion of Fourth-Amendment protections for American citizens. Her interest and deep concern stem from the FBI’s wrongful arrest of her father in 2004. Under provisions of the Patriot Act, he was detained for two weeks after being erroneously linked to the Madrid train bombings. This chilling experience and the subsequent legal actions have defined and driven much of her work here at Stanford. She has been heavily involved with the Muslim Student Awareness Network, the Students for Palestinian Equal Rights, and the Islamic Society of Stanford University. Last month, she participated in an ACLU-sponsored debate about civil liberties and the War on Terror. She talks to us about her family’s experiences, her views on civil liberties, and her thoughts about Islamophobia in our country.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS Episode 203: “Sharia Mayfield” June 6, 2012 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

June 6, 2012

An Interview with Sharia Mayfield

Sharia Mayfield is a junior majoring in English and Creative Writing. Originally from the city of Portland, in Oregon, she has long been interested in and concerned by the erosion of Fourth-Amendment protections for American citizens. Her interest and deep concern stem from the FBI’s wrongful arrest of her father in 2004. Under provisions of the Patriot Act, he was detained for two weeks after being erroneously linked to the Madrid train bombings. This chilling experience and the subsequent legal actions have defined and driven much of her work here at Stanford. She has been heavily involved with the Muslim Student Awareness Network, the Students for Palestinian Equal Rights, and the Islamic Society of Stanford University. Last month, she participated in an ACLU-sponsored debate about civil liberties and the War on Terror. She talks to us about her family’s experiences, her views on civil liberties, and her thoughts about Islamophobia in our country.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS 
Episode 203: “Sharia Mayfield” 
June 6, 2012 
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

May 30, 2012
An Interview with Brendan Cohen
Brendan Cohen is a second-year student at the law school. Originally from the town of Hanover, in New Hampshire, he did his undergraduate work at Yale, where he majored in both Astronomy and the History of Science. Upon graduating, he moved to Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and began teaching high-school physics at The Hill School. A year later, he returned to New Hampshire to teach Astronomy, Conceptual Physics, and the History of Science at St. Paul’s School in Concord. Since arriving at Stanford Law in 2010, he has been able to nurture and pursue his long-held interest in International Space Law. He spent last summer working in Vienna at the U.N.’s Office for Outer Space Affairs. Then, last quarter, he completed an externship at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field. He talks to us about his work with these organizations, the history of Space Law, and the future of the international governance of outer space.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS Episode 202: “Brendan Cohen” May 30, 2012 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

May 30, 2012

An Interview with Brendan Cohen

Brendan Cohen is a second-year student at the law school. Originally from the town of Hanover, in New Hampshire, he did his undergraduate work at Yale, where he majored in both Astronomy and the History of Science. Upon graduating, he moved to Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and began teaching high-school physics at The Hill School. A year later, he returned to New Hampshire to teach Astronomy, Conceptual Physics, and the History of Science at St. Paul’s School in Concord. Since arriving at Stanford Law in 2010, he has been able to nurture and pursue his long-held interest in International Space Law. He spent last summer working in Vienna at the U.N.’s Office for Outer Space Affairs. Then, last quarter, he completed an externship at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field. He talks to us about his work with these organizations, the history of Space Law, and the future of the international governance of outer space.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS 
Episode 202: “Brendan Cohen” 
May 30, 2012 
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

April 18, 2012
An Interview with Jenna Nicholas
Jenna Nicholas is a senior majoring in International Relations. Originally from the neighborhood of Chelsea, in London, she has long been interested in China, the emerging Chinese economy, and the potential there for civic-minded entrepreneurship and philanthropy. A pursuit of these interests has defined much of her work at Stanford. She has served as an editorial intern for the Stanford Social Innovation Review, as a researcher with the Stanford Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society, and as an organizer for the Business Association of Stanford Entrepreneurial Students. Last year, while attending Oxford University, she led the social entrepreneurship division of the Oxford Hub – Oxford’s on-campus volunteer center. Having now returned to Stanford, she continues to be one of the most active members of the undergraduate student body. She is currently a member of the Board at the Haas Center, an Academic Theme Associate in Crothers’s Global Citizen Dorm, and a student researcher with the Department of Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Her Senior Honors thesis, which draws upon countless interviews she conducted in Beijing, will explore the intersection of philanthropy, charity, and entrepreneurship in China. She is also Co-Founder of Phoenix Global Impact - an organization seeking to promote and encourage investments in Chinese social ventures. She talks to us about the prospects of philanthrocapitalism in China and also about some of the philosophical ideas that motivate her.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 201: “Jenna Nicholas”April 18, 20124:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

April 18, 2012

An Interview with Jenna Nicholas

Jenna Nicholas is a senior majoring in International Relations. Originally from the neighborhood of Chelsea, in London, she has long been interested in China, the emerging Chinese economy, and the potential there for civic-minded entrepreneurship and philanthropy. A pursuit of these interests has defined much of her work at Stanford. She has served as an editorial intern for the Stanford Social Innovation Review, as a researcher with the Stanford Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society, and as an organizer for the Business Association of Stanford Entrepreneurial Students. Last year, while attending Oxford University, she led the social entrepreneurship division of the Oxford Hub – Oxford’s on-campus volunteer center. Having now returned to Stanford, she continues to be one of the most active members of the undergraduate student body. She is currently a member of the Board at the Haas Center, an Academic Theme Associate in Crothers’s Global Citizen Dorm, and a student researcher with the Department of Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Her Senior Honors thesis, which draws upon countless interviews she conducted in Beijing, will explore the intersection of philanthropy, charity, and entrepreneurship in China. She is also Co-Founder of Phoenix Global Impact - an organization seeking to promote and encourage investments in Chinese social ventures. She talks to us about the prospects of philanthrocapitalism in China and also about some of the philosophical ideas that motivate her.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 201: “Jenna Nicholas”
April 18, 2012
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

March 10, 2012
An Interview with Anna McConnell
Anna McConnell is a sophomore majoring in Human Biology. Originally from the town of Boothbay in Maine, she has long been an advocate for global public health and socioeconomic equality. After graduating high school, she spent a year doing volunteer work in both Uganda and India. Here on campus, she writes for the Stanford Journal of Public Health and is recognized as one of the leading organizers of the Occupy Stanford movement. Like on many other campuses, Occupy Stanford emerged last fall as a group hoping to mirror and amplify the sentiments of Occupy protests happening around the world. For the past few months, she has also been involved with the nascent Occupy Education movement. Its goal is to bring attention to the problems within California’s public education system, specifically: rising tuition costs, skyrocketing student debt, and increasing privatization. Last week, Occupy Education California held a ninety-nine-mile march from Oakland to Davis and then on to the state capitol building in Sacramento. She talks to us about her work with these organizations, her experiences with the marchers, and her views about activism and civil disobedience.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 107: “Anna McConnell”March 10, 20128:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

March 10, 2012

An Interview with Anna McConnell

Anna McConnell is a sophomore majoring in Human Biology. Originally from the town of Boothbay in Maine, she has long been an advocate for global public health and socioeconomic equality. After graduating high school, she spent a year doing volunteer work in both Uganda and India. Here on campus, she writes for the Stanford Journal of Public Health and is recognized as one of the leading organizers of the Occupy Stanford movement. Like on many other campuses, Occupy Stanford emerged last fall as a group hoping to mirror and amplify the sentiments of Occupy protests happening around the world. For the past few months, she has also been involved with the nascent Occupy Education movement. Its goal is to bring attention to the problems within California’s public education system, specifically: rising tuition costs, skyrocketing student debt, and increasing privatization. Last week, Occupy Education California held a ninety-nine-mile march from Oakland to Davis and then on to the state capitol building in Sacramento. She talks to us about her work with these organizations, her experiences with the marchers, and her views about activism and civil disobedience.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 107: “Anna McConnell”
March 10, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

March 3, 2012
An Interview with Arun Prasad
Arun Prasad is a senior majoring in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Originally from the nearby town of Los Gatos, he has devoted much of his time outside of class to learning and studying the Sanskrit language. Not only has he mastered its phonology, morphology, and grammar, but he has also read and analyzed a remarkable amount of Sanskrit’s vast corpus of literature and poetry. Since the first quarter of his junior year, he has been independently working on several computational projects to help facilitate the study of Sanskrit. Using his knowledge of web design, natural language processing, and machine learning, he has built two exceptionally comprehensive websites. His first website – a step-by-step grammar guide – has already been used by thousands. Of the 23,000,000 results returned by a Google search for the phrase “Learn Sanskrit,” the grammar guide has been ranked at number one for the past year. His second website is an annotated reading library. Its goal is to make some of most daunting works of Sanskrit poetry and drama accessible to the most inexperienced of students. The annotations are not done by hand. Instead, they are generated automatically by a part-of-speech tagger and grammatical parser that he has been programming for the past several months. He talks to us about his various computational projects, his ideas about web-based approaches to classical pedagogy, and the importance of the Sanskrit language.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 106: “Arun Prasad”March 3, 20128:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

March 3, 2012

An Interview with Arun Prasad

Arun Prasad is a senior majoring in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Originally from the nearby town of Los Gatos, he has devoted much of his time outside of class to learning and studying the Sanskrit language. Not only has he mastered its phonology, morphology, and grammar, but he has also read and analyzed a remarkable amount of Sanskrit’s vast corpus of literature and poetry. Since the first quarter of his junior year, he has been independently working on several computational projects to help facilitate the study of Sanskrit. Using his knowledge of web design, natural language processing, and machine learning, he has built two exceptionally comprehensive websites. His first website – a step-by-step grammar guide – has already been used by thousands. Of the 23,000,000 results returned by a Google search for the phrase “Learn Sanskrit,” the grammar guide has been ranked at number one for the past year. His second website is an annotated reading library. Its goal is to make some of most daunting works of Sanskrit poetry and drama accessible to the most inexperienced of students. The annotations are not done by hand. Instead, they are generated automatically by a part-of-speech tagger and grammatical parser that he has been programming for the past several months. He talks to us about his various computational projects, his ideas about web-based approaches to classical pedagogy, and the importance of the Sanskrit language.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 106: “Arun Prasad”
March 3, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

February 25, 2012
An Interview with Charmaine Mangram
Charmaine Mangram is a doctoral student in the School of Education. Originally from the neighborhood of Watts, in Los Angeles, she did her undergraduate work at Williams College, where she majored in Mathematics Education. Upon graduating, she was selected to be a Teach For America corps member and taught high-school math in Mercedes, Texas. A year later, she returned to Southeast L.A. to work at Locke High School as both an instructor of Algebra and AP Calculus as well as a Guiding Teacher. After three years with the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), she began working at Ànimo Inglewood Charter High – a school operated by the Green Dot network of public charters. While continuing to teach math in Inglewood, she also served as a Mentor Teacher and completed a master’s degree in Education at Mount St. Mary’s College. Later, while studying to clear her Teaching Credential, she returned to LAUSD in a more advisory role. Under the direction of the Urban Education Partnership, she worked as a Math Literacy Coach, first at Samuel Gompers Middle School, in Southeast L.A., and then at the King Drew Medical Magnet High School. In addition to doing this work for the city, she founded the Parents’ Academic Support Network – a nonprofit seeking to empower parents and students by providing them an inside look at the Los Angeles school system. Here at Stanford, her research focuses on the often-overlooked areas of Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. She talks to us about teaching, learning, and innovating in our nation’s public schools. 

CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 105: “Charmaine Mangram”February 25, 20128:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

February 25, 2012

An Interview with Charmaine Mangram

Charmaine Mangram is a doctoral student in the School of Education. Originally from the neighborhood of Watts, in Los Angeles, she did her undergraduate work at Williams College, where she majored in Mathematics Education. Upon graduating, she was selected to be a Teach For America corps member and taught high-school math in Mercedes, Texas. A year later, she returned to Southeast L.A. to work at Locke High School as both an instructor of Algebra and AP Calculus as well as a Guiding Teacher. After three years with the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), she began working at Ànimo Inglewood Charter High – a school operated by the Green Dot network of public charters. While continuing to teach math in Inglewood, she also served as a Mentor Teacher and completed a master’s degree in Education at Mount St. Mary’s College. Later, while studying to clear her Teaching Credential, she returned to LAUSD in a more advisory role. Under the direction of the Urban Education Partnership, she worked as a Math Literacy Coach, first at Samuel Gompers Middle School, in Southeast L.A., and then at the King Drew Medical Magnet High School. In addition to doing this work for the city, she founded the Parents’ Academic Support Network – a nonprofit seeking to empower parents and students by providing them an inside look at the Los Angeles school system. Here at Stanford, her research focuses on the often-overlooked areas of Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. She talks to us about teaching, learning, and innovating in our nation’s public schools. 

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 105: “Charmaine Mangram”
February 25, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

February 11, 2012
An Interview with Omar Shakir
Omar Shakir is a second-year student at the law school. Originally from San Jose, he did his undergraduate work here at Stanford, where he majored in International Relations. Upon graduating in 2007, he spent time in Syria as a Fulbright Scholar. His academic work there focused on economic and political reform. He also led humanitarian projects in Jordan, Syria, and the Occupied Territories. Later, with the support of the Khaled Juffali Scholarship, he attended Georgetown University and completed a master’s in Arab Studies. Since returning to Stanford, he has resumed his role as one of the most energetic leaders on campus. He is president of the International Law Society, co-president of the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Program, co-chair of Stanford’s chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, and the founding vice president of the Stanford Association for Law in the Middle East. He is also co-president of Students for Palestinian Equal Rights - a group he founded at Stanford back in 2006. He talks to us about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the campus-wide effort to have Stanford University divest from companies supporting the occupation.


CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 104: “Omar Shakir”February 11, 20128:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

February 11, 2012

An Interview with Omar Shakir

Omar Shakir is a second-year student at the law school. Originally from San Jose, he did his undergraduate work here at Stanford, where he majored in International Relations. Upon graduating in 2007, he spent time in Syria as a Fulbright Scholar. His academic work there focused on economic and political reform. He also led humanitarian projects in Jordan, Syria, and the Occupied Territories. Later, with the support of the Khaled Juffali Scholarship, he attended Georgetown University and completed a master’s in Arab Studies. Since returning to Stanford, he has resumed his role as one of the most energetic leaders on campus. He is president of the International Law Society, co-president of the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Program, co-chair of Stanford’s chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, and the founding vice president of the Stanford Association for Law in the Middle East. He is also co-president of Students for Palestinian Equal Rights - a group he founded at Stanford back in 2006. He talks to us about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the campus-wide effort to have Stanford University divest from companies supporting the occupation.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 104: “Omar Shakir”
February 11, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

February 4, 2012
An Interview with Miles Unterreiner
Miles Unterreiner is a senior majoring in History. Originally from the town of Gig Harbor in Washington state, he is widely recognized on campus as an athlete and a writer. A distance runner on both the Track team and the Cross Country team, his column, “I Do Choose to Run,” appears every Monday in the Stanford Daily. The column deals primarily with American politics, foreign affairs, and moral philosophy. He has been an editor for both the Stanford Journal of International Relations as well as the undergraduate History journal, “Herodotus.” For the past two years, he has also served as president of Stanford’s chapter of the ACLU.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS Episode 103: “Miles Unterreiner” February 4, 2012 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

February 4, 2012

An Interview with Miles Unterreiner

Miles Unterreiner is a senior majoring in History. Originally from the town of Gig Harbor in Washington state, he is widely recognized on campus as an athlete and a writer. A distance runner on both the Track team and the Cross Country team, his column, “I Do Choose to Run,” appears every Monday in the Stanford Daily. The column deals primarily with American politics, foreign affairs, and moral philosophy. He has been an editor for both the Stanford Journal of International Relations as well as the undergraduate History journal, “Herodotus.” For the past two years, he has also served as president of Stanford’s chapter of the ACLU.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS 
Episode 103: “Miles Unterreiner” 
February 4, 2012 
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

January 28, 2012
An Interview with Joshua Schott
Josh Schott is a sophomore majoring in International Relations. Originally from the town of Whitefish, Montana, he has been an activist for social justice and humanitarian causes since his early teens. Here at Stanford, he is president of Stanford Says No to War, an officer of Students for Palestinian Equal Rights, and a key organizer of the on-going Occupy Stanford movement. This summer, he will be making his second trip to the West Bank to help and show solidarity with the Palestinian struggle. Before he leaves campus, however, one of his primary goals is to introduce a Peace Studies major at Stanford. He talks to us about his various projects and his ideas.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 102: “Joshua Schott”January 28, 20128:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

January 28, 2012

An Interview with Joshua Schott

Josh Schott is a sophomore majoring in International Relations. Originally from the town of Whitefish, Montana, he has been an activist for social justice and humanitarian causes since his early teens. Here at Stanford, he is president of Stanford Says No to War, an officer of Students for Palestinian Equal Rights, and a key organizer of the on-going Occupy Stanford movement. This summer, he will be making his second trip to the West Bank to help and show solidarity with the Palestinian struggle. Before he leaves campus, however, one of his primary goals is to introduce a Peace Studies major at Stanford. He talks to us about his various projects and his ideas.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 102: “Joshua Schott”
January 28, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

January 21, 2012
An Interview with Amrita Lonkar
Amrita Lonkar is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Originally from the city of Aligarh in northern India, she did her undergraduate work at IIT Kanpur and holds a master’s degree from Stanford. Amrita’s research focuses on using computers to simulate the flow of air across a plasma actuator. She is especially interested in the use of plasma actuators to control the flow around wind turbines. It is a technology that may soon change the face of renewable energy and revolutionize modern aviation.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONSEpisode 101: “Amrita Lonkar”January 21, 20128:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

January 21, 2012

An Interview with Amrita Lonkar

Amrita Lonkar is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Originally from the city of Aligarh in northern India, she did her undergraduate work at IIT Kanpur and holds a master’s degree from Stanford. Amrita’s research focuses on using computers to simulate the flow of air across a plasma actuator. She is especially interested in the use of plasma actuators to control the flow around wind turbines. It is a technology that may soon change the face of renewable energy and revolutionize modern aviation.

CARDINAL DIRECTIONS
Episode 101: “Amrita Lonkar”
January 21, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.